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Hull, Yorkshire (England)

Last modified: 2010-07-16 by rob raeside
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Description of the flag

A blue and gold flag (three gold crowns above each other on a blue field) based on the coat of arms for the city was seen flying in Queen's Gardens, Hull. This design was first seen on a seal dated 1331. The crowns have variously been described as 'royal crowns' or 'ducal coronets' and 'crest crowns'. The present blazon describes the arms as 'three crowns or in a field of azure'. There are a number of traditions as to why there are three crowns. One tradition suggests it's because of the three English monarchs involved in the founding and development of the early town. (Edward I, Edward II and Henry VI). Another suggests is to do with the three great lords responsible for the development of the city. There is even tradition that links it to the Three Kings who acme to visit the baby Jesus at his birth. Generally however it is accepted now that it is most likely due to the town's devotion to the Holy Trinity. (For example, the main church of the mediaeval town was ascribed to the Trinity.)
Paul Leaver, 6 September 2005

According to my copy of The Colours of the Fleet (created & compiled by Malcolm Farrow OBE, FCMI and edited by David Prothero), Hull City Council has a flag meriting "further research but when the council is sitting a red ensign defaced with a shield (azure bearing three coronets in pale or) in the fly, is flown above the city hall.
Keir Heath, 24 December 2009

When I saw this flag, it was flying on the flagpole on the Alfred Gelder Street side of the Guildhall, rather than over the main entrance (which normally flies two banners of arms). Such a flag has certainly been in use for over thirty years, because the Flag Institute did a survey of British local government flags in the late 1960s/early 1970s (not sure of the date - it was certainly before the big reorganisation in 1973-74), and Hull City Council reported using a defaced Red Ensign then.
Ian Sumner, 31 December 2009